1. Glass Swords, an album by Rustie on Spotify We and our partners use cookies to personalize your experience, to show you ads based on your interests, and for measurement and analytics purposes. By using our website and our services, you agree to our use of cookies as described in our Cookie Policy.
  2. On Glass Swords, Rustie continues to integrate the currently hip and terminally unhip -- garish probes of ‘80s synth rock, beaten-to-a-pulp dance-pop, ‘90s rave, and bass music, to name four of several drawing points -- all for the sake of a rush. Integrate is a light way of putting it, though; the method is more like slathering, layer after layer, with no concern for restraint or tastefulness, though each track is 8/
  3. On Glass Swords, Rustie continues to integrate the currently hip and terminally unhip -- garish probes of '80s synth rock, beaten-to-a-pulp dance-pop, '90s rave, and bass music, to name four of several drawing points -- all for the sake of a rush. Integrate is a light way of putting it, though; the method is more like slathering, layer after layer, with no concern for restraint or tastefulness, though each track is Price: $
  4. Oct 10,  · Glass Swords is the debut studio album by Scottish producer Russell Whyte under his alias of Rustie, released by Warp in The album was produced and recorded between 20by Whyte, partially in his father's home in Glasgow, Scotland /5(69).
  5. Dec 12,  · By fan favorite “Cry Flames,” which paraphrases the belch on Ginuwine’s “Pony,” it’s hard to believe that Rustie didn’t compose the album with a complete, or piece R&B/funk band.
  6. The now-classic early releases showcased Rustie's love for obscure Japanese prog-rock, bit video game sonics, icy grime and Detroit techno; creating a vision of the future of rave music. But for Glass Swords, his immensely anticipated, two-years-in-the-making full length debut, Rustie ushers in an otherworldly landscape.
  7. Sep 30,  · From the clenched fist, 3am desperation of Cry Flames to the crystalline dreams of After Light, ‘Glass Swords’ is a perfect rendering of a dream world that Rustie could only realise through sound. Just listen to the album: feel your way.
  8. Like Mohawke’s album Butter, the all-pervasive influence on Glass Swords is prog rock – both in the screaming guitar-style solos that cut though several of its tracks and in its commitment to pure.
  9. With such keen melodic sense, rhythmic knack and timbral identity, it does feel as if – with the right singer – Rustie could lively up UK pop with his synthesis of the bits it's missing. On the other hand, Glass Swords shows that his aesthetic is developed enough to carry an album in its own right. Even the airbrush cover art and quasi-synaesthetic titles ('Glass Swords', 'Cry Flames', 'Crystal Echo') work .

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